The premier destination for fun science projects & experiments for kids grades K-8 since 2010!

Grade 7

  • Make a simple Hummingbird feeder

    Hummingbirds can consume up to twice their body weight in nectar every day. You can observe these fascinating birds in action by making a hummingbird feeder for your garden in the following science experiment.

    Read more
  • Make a Snellen chart to test your friends’ eyesight

    An optometrist is a doctor concerned with your eyes as well as your vision. A 'Snellen' eye chart is the most common way for optometrists to determine how 'normal' your vision is. It sets a standard for what most...

    Read more
  • Make a box trap to capture nocturnal insects

    Night insects like mosquitoes, moths and the like, buzzes your ears constantly, they bite you, or even takes up residence in your home. Use a box-trap to catch some of these 'nocturnal' insects in the following science experiment.

    Read more
  • Make a ‘Berlese’ funnel to catch soil-burrowing insects

    Farmers hate soil-burrowing insects because the can destroy a field of crops or a garden overnight. During the day they hide under rotten, rubble or a thin layer of soil, just to emerge in the dark to consume an...

    Read more
  • Test how much Vitamin C is in fruit juice

    We all know how important it is to get enough 'Vitamin C' in one's diet, but which fruit juices contains the most Vitamin C? Find out in the following science experiment.

    Read more
  • Trees act as large solar panels – Calculate the area of the leaves

    Using energy from the sun, plants rearrange water and carbon dioxide to form sugar or 'energy' thus, the leaves of a plant or a tree and can be seen as miniature sunlight collectors or solar panels. Use the method...

    Read more
  • Make your own homemade telescope

    Fancy becoming an astronomer and find out more about the stars in our galaxy? It is quite easy to make a simple refracting telescope which could help you study the moon and the stars in more detail.

    Read more
  • Make your own homemade periscope

    The most common example of the use of a 'periscope' is in submarines. The commanders of submarines use the periscope to look above the surface of the sea level while they are still submersed below the surface of the...

    Read more
  • Build your own camera out of a shoe box

    All cameras work by focusing light onto a light sensitive material called 'film'. In this science experiment, let's build our own 'camera obscura' out of a shoe box to see how this works.

    Read more
  • Study which materials works best as a heat insulator

    Air can be quite an effective heat insulator as it does not let heat pass through it easily. A thermos flask, polystyrene cup, or double glazed windows are all good examples of a layer of air acting as a...

    Read more