The premier destination for fun science projects & experiments for kids grades K-8 since 2010!

Grade 8

  • Make a wire spring jump up and down with electro-magnetism

    In this science experiment, you will use the power of electric current to make a thin wire coil behave in a mysterious way. When current is passed along a conductor, the conductor behaves like a magnet, especially if the...

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  • Learn about sending Morse code signals with your own telegraph

    With this device messages could be sent over a far distance instantly and this was only the starting block for the modern communication devices we use today! In this science experiment we will be re-creating that means of communicating...

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  • Listen to the news by building your own foxhole radio

    A foxhole radio basically consists of only a coil and a detector. You don't need a crystal diode or batteries to make it work as it is powered only by the radio waves present in the air. In the...

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  • Measure the humidity level with your own hygrometer

    The humidity level is an indication of the likelihood of rain occurring and this is measured using a hygrometer. Make your own weather predictions by building your own simple hygrometer in the following science experiment.

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  • Make a simple device to measure the dew point

    The 'dewpoint' temperature is the temperature at which the air can no longer hold all of its water vapour, and some of the water vapour is forced to condense into liquid water. The dew point is always lower or...

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  • Make a tornado in a bottle

    Similar to a real tornado, the whirlpool tornado in this science experiment is shaped by very powerful forces. Real tornadoes occur when hot and cold streams of air suddenly collide.

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  • Make a simple astrolabe to measure the altitude of objects in the sky

    An 'astrolabe' is a device used for measuring altitude, including the height of objects in the sky. The name has its origins from the Greek words 'astron' and 'lambanien' meaning 'the one who catches the heavenly bodies'. Creating your...

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  • Make a simple seismograph

    Scientists use special machines called 'seismographs' to record the 'seismic waves', or movements in the earth's crust. Each magnitude number on the 'Richter scale' represents the maximum amplitude of a seismic wave at a distance of about 160 kilometres....

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  • Make an inclinometer or dipping compass

    Airplane pilots often make use of a device called an 'inclinometer' to give them an idea of the angle that their aircraft makes with the horizon. Make your own 'inclinometer' in the following science experiment.

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  • Demonstrate how a total solar eclipse works

    A total solar eclipse, also called totality, occurs when a shadow, called an 'Umbra', falls on a region of the earth. People near it, in the 'Penumbra', see only a partial solar eclipse in which not all of the...

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