The premier destination for fun science projects & experiments for kids grades K-8 since 2010!

<24 Hours

  • Make a face with an electro-magnetic wire

    In this science experiment we will be learning more about the relationship between electricity, electrical current, magnets and the laws of magnetism. The connection between electric current and magnetism is very important because as a result electric motors and...

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  • Make a tornado in a bottle

    Similar to a real tornado, the whirlpool tornado in this science experiment is shaped by very powerful forces. Real tornadoes occur when hot and cold streams of air suddenly collide.

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  • Make your own barometer to measure the air pressure

    The atmospheric pressure or 'air pressure' can be explained as the 'push' that air exerts on its surroundings at a given point. The air pressure level can also be an indication of the likelihood of rain occurring and this...

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  • Study the effect your location in a tall building have on gravitational pull

    Even though some forces exist in nature that we are unable to see, we still are able to see what effect such forces, such as 'gravity' can have with some interesting science experiments. Gravity can be explained as the...

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  • Find some rare earth metals in ordinary garden soil

    Feel like doing some mining for rare metals in your own garden? The dirt in ordinary garden soil can contain very small particles of magnetic material or 'metals'. In this science experiment, find and study this particles with a...

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  • Use cornstarch to make a substance that behaves like a solid and a liquid

    The earth's surface layers are made of solid material, but a small layer in between the crust and the mantle exists called the 'partial melting zone'. This layer consisting of a strange putty-like liquid, and is the reason the...

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  • Make a simple seismograph

    Scientists use special machines called 'seismographs' to record the 'seismic waves', or movements in the earth's crust. Each magnitude number on the 'Richter scale' represents the maximum amplitude of a seismic wave at a distance of about 160 kilometres....

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  • Test if ice takes up less or more space than water

    Water can exist in three different forms: liquid, gas in the form of 'water vapour', or a solid in the form of ice. Solid water is formed when liquid water cools down to '0' degrees ˚C, its freezing point....

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  • Simulate the refraction patterns of stars in the sky

    Stars are so far away from the earth, that when you look up at the stars in the sky, you don't see the stars, but rather only the refraction patterns of their light millions of kilometers away. In this...

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  • Learn about the phases of the moon with your own moon box

    A good way to understand the phases of the moon is to examine the sun's effect on the moon during its various phases, with the following science experiment.

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